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Fishing Calendar

Sailing Everyday- All Year 7:30 am to 3:30 pm

FARES: DAY
Adults: $95
Senior Citizens (over 62): $90
Children (under 16): $40
Rod Rental: $6


 

JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

OCTOBER

NOVEMBER

DECEMBER


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Albacore

The albacore, known also as the longfin tuna, is a species of tuna of the order Perciformes. It is found in temperate and tropical waters across the globe in the epipelagic and mesopelagic zones. There are six distinct stocks known globally in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans, as well as the Mediterranean Sea.

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Black Sea Bass

Centropristis striata Double dorsal fin, broad vertical stripes, brown/grey to blue/black shading. They darken at death, and gain an etched appearance due to scales that bleach instead of darkening. 1 1/2 to 5 lbs size range. They like deep water with hard bottoms, 20-50 feet in bay areas (spring/ summer), up to 100ft deep in the ocea (fall/ winter).

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Bluefish

Not actually a mackerel despite the nicknames above, it belongs to the family Pomatomidae. Average weight 2lbs, can get up to 20lbs. A greenish, iridescent blue shading into silver on the sides. Baby bluefish, called snapper blues, are more flatish, and are found in the local lagoons from late May through September. The base of the pectoral fin usually has a black blotch. There are two dorsal fins, the front dorsal being more spiney. The bluefish is a savage predator that will eat virtually anything that crosses its path. The highly migratory bluefish can grow to over 50lb, and travels in huge schools that go into a feeding frenzy when they encounter shoals of prey fish such as herring or menhaden. They have been known to come close inshore and attack bathers, and their sharp, prominent, triangular teeth can inflict painful wounds. They should be handled with care when caught, especially when they are being unhooked.

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Bonito

Bonitos are a tribe of medium-sized, ray-finned predatory fish in the family Scombridae – a family it shares with the mackerel, tuna, and Spanish mackerel tribes, and also the butterfly kingfish.

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Cod

Cod is the common name for the demersal fish genus Gadus, belonging to the family Gadidae. Cod is also used as part of the common name for a number of other fish species, and one species that belongs to genus Gadus is commonly not called cod.

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Flounder

Flounders are a group of flatfish species. They are demersal fish, found at the bottom of oceans around the world; some species will also enter estuaries.

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Ling

The ling is a slim, long-bodied fish with small scales, a long anal fin, and two dorsal fins, the second being much longer than the first. A large, mottled, brown or greenish fish, the ling may grow to a length of about 2 m (almost 7 feet).

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Mackeral

Mackerel is a common name applied to a number of different species of pelagic fish, mostly from the family Scombridae. They are found in both temperate and tropical seas, mostly living along the coast or offshore in the oceanic environment. The Atlantic Mackeral, the Spanish Mackeral, and the Boston Mackeral can be found off the NJ coast. Distinctively patterned backs in blue with black striping, and pale belly. Great bait fish: blues, weakfish, etc.

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Pollack

Pollock or pollack is the common name used for either of the two species of North Atlantic marine fish in the genus Pollachius. Pollachius pollachius is referred to as pollock in both North America and the United Kingdom, while Pollachius virens is usually known as coley in Great Britain and Ireland.

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Porgies

The Sparidae are a family of fish in the order Perciformes, commonly called sea breams and porgies. The sheepshead, scup, and red seabream are species in this family. Porgies live in shallow temperate marine waters and are bottom-dwelling carnivores. Most species possess grinding, molar-like teeth. They are often good eating fish, particularly the gilt-head bream and the dentex.

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Summer Fluke

Both flat-sided bottom fish, the main physical difference between the two is the design of the mouth. The Fluke has the larger mouth, full of teeth. The Flounder's mouth is hardly more than an inch around, and lacks visible teeth.

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Tautog

Tautoga onitis. There is some confusion between this fish and the Black Sea Bass. Physically, they are very different. The Tautog ranges in size from 1lb up to a record 25 lbs. Dark olive to dark gray in color, female and young have patchy coloration. Snout is short and blunt. The caudal, or tail fin, is much more rounded than the Sea bass, without the distinctive trailing spine on the top of the tail. The tautog prefers waters up to 60 feet deep, aroung reefs, wrecks, and other sheltered areas.

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Whiting

Merlangius merlangus, commonly known as whiting or merling, is an important food fish in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean and the northern Mediterranean, western Baltic, and Black Sea. In Anglophonic countries outside the whiting's natural range, the name has been applied to various other species of fish.